Program Requirements for History

Applicable only to students admitted during the 2015-2016 academic year.

History

College of Letters and Science

Graduate Degrees

The Department of History offers the Master of Arts (M.A.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees in History.

Admissions Requirements

Master’s Degree

Advising

The program only admits students to the Ph.D. program. During the first two years of study toward the Ph.D. degree, each student’s study plan (in consultation with the assigned Faculty Adviser) consists of coursework, language training, and teaching apprenticeships. Completion of the requirements for the Master’s degree is designed to meet requirements for admission to the department’s doctoral program. Please consult the requirements for the doctoral degree.

Areas of Study

The comprehensive examination covers one of the following fields: (1) Ancient (includes ancient Middle East) and late antiquity; (2) Medieval; (3) European History, ca 1450 to present (also includes British History, Jewish, Russian, East Central and Southeast European History); (4) Africa; (5) Middle East (includes Armenia); (6) South and Southeast Asia; (7) China; (8) Japan; (9) Latin America; (10) U.S.; (11) History of Science; (12) Jewish History; (13) Special Fields (students in the History of Religions or History of Christianity are normally examined in one of the above fields).

Foreign Language Requirement

A reading knowledge of one foreign language approved by the department is required for the M.A degree. It is recommended that this requirement be met in the first year of graduate work, except for students in the European field, who should meet this requirement during the first quarter of graduate work. Students of U.S. History must pass a departmentally-administered reading examination, successfully complete the third year of university language instruction, or demonstrate (via petition) that it is the student’s native language. Students in the Middle East must demostrate to the satisfaction of their faculty advisor competency in two Middle Eastern Languages. Students in African History must demonstrate proficiency in at least one foreign language by passing a departmentally administered exam or via Education Testing Services in European languages and UCLA internal assessment in African language. Students of European History must take a departmental translation examination in French, Italian, Spanish, Dutch, German, or Russian, preferably during the first quarter of graduate work, as noted above, but no later than the beginning of the sixth quarter of full-time study. Students in Medieval History must have an excellent command of Latin, French, and German, as well as other modern and medieval languages, necessary for their areas of research. For the M.A. degree, only one language is required, competencies could be fulfilled by: completing six quarters (four semesters) of language with a ‘B’ or better grade, successful completion of a departmental administered examination by a faculty member, completing two quarters of Medieval Latin at the 100 level with a ‘B’ or better grade, or passing the Latin Exam set by the Classics department. Students of Chinese History must have a minimum of three years of Chinese. Students of Japanese History must have a minimum of three years of Japanese language coursework (Intermediate level). History of Science, Medicine and Technology students must pass two foreign languages in the first two years of study — one must be completed before the written examinations, and both must be completed before the oral examination. For other languages, students must arrange to take a language examination administered by a faculty member in the History department or a foreign language department at UCLA; certification of competence is made in accord with the standards of the language department faculty.

Course Requirements

The department requires a minimum of nine upper division and graduate courses in history, at least six of which must be graduate courses. The six graduate courses must include at least one continuing two- or three-quarter research seminar which must include the preparation of a substantial research paper.

For students in African history, six of the nine required courses must be at the graduate level, only one course in the 500 series may count and none in the 300 or 400 series will be counted. In addition to enrolling in History 204 (Fall seminar), first year students in African History are strongly encouraged to enroll in African Studies 201A, and inter-disciplinary seminar offered by the Interdepartmental Degree Program in African Studies each fall quarter. This course could substitute for a History 200/201 during the first quarter of study in the graduate program.

Students in Ancient History are required to complete at least one continuing two- or three-quarter seminar, or alternatively, a continuing sequence of at least two graduate courses.

Students in History of Science, Medicine and Technology are required to take at least two, 2-quarter research seminars in the first two years of study and are expected to take History 200O-Advanced Historiography in History of Science- twice, in the fall quarters of their first and second years.

Students in Chinese History must complete at least one two-quarter research seminar, History 282A-282B, in the major field.

Students in Japanese History must complete one continuing two-or-three quarter research seminars or alternatively, a continuing sequence of at least two graduate courses-which must all include the completion of a substantial research paper, based at least in part on primary sources.

Students in Jewish History are required to complete at least one continuing two- or three-quarter seminar or alternatively, a continuing sequence of at least two graduate courses.

Students in Medieval History must take History 200C-Advanced Historiography or its equivalent, and must complete a two- or three-quarter research seminar or a sequence of two graduate history courses that results in the writing of a research based paper on primary sources.

Students in Latin American History must complete a two-quarter research seminar (History 266, 267, 268). The completion of two graduate seminars in the same subfield (colonial or modern) may be applied to satisfy the two-quarter research requirement if a relevant two-quarter seminar has not been offered during a student’s term of pre-candidacy (i.e., within two to three years).

Students in Middle East History must complete two of the following seminars: Historiography of the Pre-Modern Middle East, Historiography of the Early-Modern Middle East, and Historiography of the Modern Middle East.

Students in South and Southeast Asian History must complete at least one continuing two- or three-quarter seminar, or alternatively, a continuing sequence of at least two graduate courses.

For students in U.S. History, the minimum of nine courses must all be at the 200 level, including History 246A-246B-246C, at least two continuing two-quarter seminars or a continuing sequence of two graduate courses resulting in an original research paper, one seminar in another field in this department, and one graduate level course in another department. U.S. History students also have to take History 204, the departmental seminar on historiography.

For students in fields other than U.S. History, only one 500-series course may be applied toward both the total course requirement and the minimum six graduate (200-series) course requirement. This may be either four units of 596 or four units of 597. History 495 and courses in the 300 series are not applicable toward course requirements.

Teaching Experience

Not required.

Field Experience

Not required.

Comprehensive Examination Plan

The department follows the comprehensive examination plan. Individual fields specify the fulfillment of the examination requirement by (1) a three-hour written examination designed to assess the candidate’s ability to synthesize a broad field of knowledge; or (2) the submission of three essays written for at least two different professors as part of the candidate’s program of study. At least two of these papers must have been submitted for graduate courses in the 200 series. In addition, some fields have examination formats that differ from the above, and specify dates when the examinations are given, as follows:

The U.S. field requires students to pass the written comprehensive examination following 12 months in academic residence, to earn the M.A. degree, and continue to the oral qualifying examination for admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. Students who fail the examination may retake it once by petition when it is offered again at the beginning of the next Fall Quarter. Students failing the exam a second time will not continue in the program.

Students in the European field take the doctoral written qualifying examination, during spring break between the fifth and sixth quarters in residence (i.e. in the second year).

Students in the China field are examined in three fields, and must begin the written qualifying exams no later than the end of the ninth quarter of graduate work. Further, the oral qualifying examination is based on the dissertation prospectus and is scheduled once the three written examinations have been successfully completed.

The African field requires a four-hour comprehensive examination to be completed in May of the second year of sutdy. Students entering the program with an M.A. degree must complete the examination by May of the first year or second year of study. Students entering with an M.A. in African Studies or African History are exempt from this examination requirement.

The History of Science field requires students to achieve a satisfactory pass in the doctoral written qualifying examination administered at the end of the sixth quarter of study, normally in June of the second year.

The Middle East field requires students to achieve a satisfactory pass of the doctoral written qualifying examination.

At the end of the first year for Medieval History students, the field committee will evaluate the results of a student’s coursework, and research paper, and will determine whether a student will be awarded an M.A., and be admitted to the Ph.D. program.

The comprehensive examination, regardless of format, is graded (1) pass to continue to the Ph.D.; (2) pass, subject to reevaluation for continuance to the Ph.D.; (3) terminal M.A. pass; or (4) fail. In cases where the M.A. degree is awarded with pass subject to reevaluation, the field M.A. committee conducts a special reevaluation of the candidate’s progress after no more than three additional quarters of study.

All students must file a petition for advancement to candidacy with the Graduate Office within the first two weeks of the quarter in which they expect to receive their master’s degree.

Thesis Plan

None.

Time-to-Degree

Students are advised to complete the Master’s requirements within six quarters of full-time study. The department will recommend to the Graduate Division that students who do not complete the requirements for the Master’s Degree within six quarters be terminated from graduate study, unless, by petition, the Graduate Affairs Committee grants an extension of time.

DEGREE NORMATIVE TIME TO ATC (Quarters) NORMATIVE TTD

MAXIMUM TTD

MA 6 6 6

Doctoral Degree

Advising

Entering students must select and submit the name of a faculty adviser to the graduate adviser by the end of the sixth week of the first quarter. Students are expected to meet with the adviser no less than two times a quarter during the first year. By the end of six quarters, students must submit the name of a dissertation chair and committee members to the graduate counselor. During the third year, students are expected to maintain contact (at least two times during the quarter) with the dissertation chair and all committee members, including the faculty member from the outside field. Upon advancing to candidacy, students are expected to maintain contact (at least three times during the year) with the dissertation chair. Failure to maintain contact with the dissertation chair and committee members will result in departmental probationary status and may result in a recommendation for termination of graduate study. The department’s graduate adviser, a full-time staff member, monitors the progress of students in their programs. Students are encouraged to consult the graduate adviser about requirements and procedures for progress toward the Ph.D. degree.

The departmental Graduate Affairs Committee, consisting of five faculty members and one graduate student are appointed by the chair of the department. The committee reviews and makes recommendations regarding all doctoral programs, and any petitions requesting exceptions from the regular program requirements. The vice chair for graduate affairs is an ex officio member of this committee and channels all petitions and programs for review to the committee. The student’s committee chair is normally consulted about petitions and exceptions.

The following evaluation procedures determine whether continuing students may proceed to the Ph.D. degree:

Students who enter the graduate program with a B.A. degree: an evaluation comparable to the M.A. comprehensive examination must occur within the period of six quarters.

Students who enter with a master’s degree from another department: an evaluation must be completed by the end of three quarters of study in the History Department in order to determine whether or not they are permitted to continue toward the Ph.D. This evaluation is conducted in the same manner as described under the M.A. program.

All students must present to the Graduate Affairs Committee a field approval form signed by the faculty member who has agreed to support their work for the Ph.D., and in accord with the following schedule: by the end of the seventh quarter or earlier for those who enter with only a B.A. degree, and by the end of the third quarter or earlier for those entering with an M.A. degree from another department. Students who do not meet the time limits for proceeding to the Ph.D. degree are subject to dismissal.

An annual review of all graduate students is conducted every Spring Quarter by the Graduate Affairs Committee. Letters are written to those students with program or grade-point deficiencies or other academic problems.

Major Fields or Subdisciplines

Ancient Greece; Ancient Rome; medieval constitutional and legal; medieval social and economic; medieval ecclesiastical and religious; medieval intellectual and cultural (specialists in medieval history may offer no more than two of these fields in medieval history); Byzantine; ancient Middle East; the Middle East, 500 to 1300; the Middle East 1300-1700; the Middle East since 1700; Armenian; survey of African history; topics in African history (preferably on a regional basis); history of science since ca 1450; Topics in European history from c.1450 onward (for Russia from c.800 onwards) – for further information, see the section below for the European Field; China 900 to 1800; China since 1800; early modern Japan; modern Japan; pre-modern Korea; modern Korea; South Asia; Southeast Asia; Latin America, 1492 to 1830; Latin America since 1830; Latin America and globalization; history of religions; Jewish history; history of Christianity; comparative history; U.S.: Afro-American, American diplomatic, American West, American Indian, Asian American, California, history of the South, Civil War and Reconstruction, Colonial, cultural, economic, immigration, intellectual, Jeffersonian and Jackson Ian America (1800 to 1850), labor, 20th century, urban, women’s history.

Comparative history Ph.D. students may choose comparative history as one of their four fields. This means choosing one topic across three existing Ph.D. fields. The topic should be chosen with the help of the student’s Ph.D. advisers; among possible topics are labor history, women’s history, history of religions, economic history, and many others. The geographical/temporal fields covered may correspond to some or all of the other student’s three Ph.D. fields. The comparative field is more intensive and involves genuine comparisons. It is highly recommended (and comparative chairs may require) that those majoring in a Western field choose one non-Western field and vice versa. Two or three professors may, if needed, supervise a comparative program, and may help examine the candidate either on the orals or by written examination.

Foreign Language Requirement

A reading knowledge of the languages listed below for the major fields is required. If only two languages are listed for the field, students must demonstrate competency by passing examinations administered by the department, for certain fields, or by the appropriate language department. Students in European history must take departmental translation examinations. In cases where the field deems it appropriate, coursework or alternate languages may be used to fulfill the language requirements, subject to the approval of the field coordinator and faculty adviser. For a third or fourth language, evidence of competence satisfactory to the chair of the doctoral committee is considered acceptable.

No oral qualifying examination for the Ph.D. degree may be scheduled until students have passed an examination in at least two foreign languages, except for students in U.S. history, who are required to demonstrate competency in only one foreign language.

African History: Students must demonstrate proficiency and pass an examination in at least two languages, one of which must be an African language.

Ancient History: Students must pass examinations, or fulfill appropriate coursework in two Ancient languages (Latin, Greek, Hebrew, Aramaic, Egyptian, etc.) and Modern languages in French, and German for all students and Italian for students in Roman History.

Chinese History: A minimum of three years of Chinese; for the Ph.D., a high degree of proficiency in Chinese, and, normally, at least one quarter of third-year Japanese. In certain cases, reading knowledge of another foreign language may also be required. Admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. in the Chinese field requires the completion of a research seminar in the major field. Successful completion of this seminar requires the equivalent of at least four years of superior college-level language work in Chinese.

European History: Students must demonstrate proficiency in two foreign languages prior to advancement to candidacy. Proficiency in foreign languages is to be determined by successful completion of a departmental language examination. Exceptions to this rule must be approved by the faculty adviser, the field coordinator, and the Vice Chair of graduate affairs. For those working on (1) Europe: French and German, either of which can be replaced by another language deemed necessary for research; (2) Russian or East European history: Russian plus German or French, any of which can be replaced by another language deemed necessary for research. All substitutions must be approved via petition by the faculty adviser, the field coordinator, and the Vice Chair for graduate affairs.

Japanese History: For the Ph.D., four years of Japanese coursework (Advanced level) or its equivalent, demonstrated ability in specialized Japanese that will allow one to read source materials (e.g. coursework or its equivalent in Kanbun, Sorobun, Bungotai, Meiji documents). Admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. in the Japanese field requires the completion of a research seminar in the major field. Successful completion of this seminar usually requires the equivalent of at least four years of superior college-level language work in Japanese.

Jewish History: Students must pass departmental examinations in at least two foreign languages which are to be determined in consultation with the student’s adviser. Students should consult with their primary adviser in the first year of graduate study to determine the course of language preparation most suitable to their research interests.

Latin American History: Students in the Latin American field should demonstrate fluency in Spanish or Portuguese and proficiency in a second language, including Spanish, Portuguese, French, or an indigenous language, such as Nahuatl or Quechua, in accordance with the student’s particular research interests.

Medieval History: All medievalists must have an excellent command of Latin, French, and/or German, as well as any other modern and medieval languages necessary for their particular areas of research.

Middle East History: Students must pass departmental language examinations in two Middle Eastern languages, and one European language other than English, prior to advancement to candidacy. These languages should be germane to the student’s present and future research interests and are chosen in consultation with the student’s adviser. Those students who seek to specialize in Armenian history must demonstrate a reading knowledge of Classical Armenian (Grabar), one European language other than English, and at least one other Middle Eastern language germane to the student’s present and future research interests and chosen in consultation with his/her faculty adviser.

History of Science: Prior to advancement to candidacy, students must demonstrate proficiency in two foreign languages. Students must consult with their faculty advisers to settle on the languages most necessary for their research and training in the field. Students planning to write dissertations on U.S. topics may petition to waive the requirement for a second foreign language if they can show that the dissertation would benefit from such language proficiency.

South and Southeast Asian history: Before proceeding to their dissertation, students must pass reading comprehension examinations in at least two relevant languages. A reading comprehension will also be required for at least one language, other than English, external to the region, normally drawn from French, Dutch, Portuguese, Spanish, Arabic, Persian (for South Asia), Chinese or Japanese (for Southeast Asia). However, with the approval of the student’s adviser, the student may petition to have the second language also be drawn from the country or cultural area being studied by the student.

U.S. history: One modern foreign language to be fulfilled through a departmental language examination.

Except in the fields of African, Asian, British, and U.S. history, reading knowledge of an appropriate language is usually required for admission to all graduate seminars.

Course Requirements

All incoming students are required to complete History 204 (Fall seminar) and complete at least one continuing two- or three-quarter seminar, which must include the preparation of a substantial research paper (two continuing two-quarter seminars are required for students in European history, History of Science and U.S. history).

All students must write a dissertation prospectus (for credit under History 596 or 597) which is expected to contain (1) a full statement of the dissertation topic; (2) a historiographical discussion of the literature bearing on the topic; (3) a statement of the methodology to be employed; and (4) a survey of the sources sufficient to demonstrate the viability of the topic. The prospectus must be submitted in writing to the dissertation adviser for approval prior to the oral part of the qualifying examinations. After approval, a copy of the prospectus is given to each member of the examining committee.

The following coursework is required in specific fields: (1) U.S. history — History 246A-246B-246C, one graduate seminar in another field in the department, and one graduate level course in another department; (2) European history — History 204; (3) Chinese history — two research seminars, History 282A-282B; (4) Middle East history — two of the following seminars: Historiography of the Pre-Modern Middle East, Historiography of the Early-Modern Middle East, and Historiography of the Modern Middle East; (5) History of Science — History 200O twice (in the fall quarters of the first and second years).

Students who are admitted with subject deficiencies must complete courses in addition to those required for the degree program.

Members of doctoral committees may require that individual students complete additional courses that they deem necessary for preparation for the qualifying examinations. Courses taken to fulfill M.A. degree requirements may be used to satisfy Ph.D. degree requirements.

Teaching Experience

The department cannot provide teaching experience for all Ph.D. candidates and therefore does not require it for the degree. However, students should be able to demonstrate the ability to give instruction in their field.

Written and Oral Qualifying Examinations

Academic Senate regulations require all doctoral students to complete and pass University written and oral qualifying examinations prior to doctoral advancement to candidacy. Also, under Senate regulations the University oral qualifying examination is open only to the student and appointed members of the doctoral committee. In addition to University requirements, some graduate programs have other pre-candidacy examination requirements. What follows in this section is how students are required to fulfill all of these requirements for this doctoral program.

All Fields

Students with outstanding incomplete grades may not be permitted to sit for the written and oral qualifying examinations. The written qualifying examination must be passed before the oral qualifying examination can be taken. Students must begin the written qualifying examinations no later than the end of the ninth quarter of graduate study. To be eligible to sit for their qualifying examinations, student must have completed all their coursework and language requirements.

In the written and oral qualifying examinations, students are expected to demonstrate not only a mastery of their special subject, but also an extensive knowledge covering the wider field of historical knowledge; in addition, they must demonstrate an ability to correlate historical data and to explain their significance. Therefore these examinations are designed to test not just factual knowledge, but also power of historical analysis and synthesis, critical ability, and capacity for reflective thinking. Knowledge of the history of any area includes a solid understanding of its historiography and bibliography, its geography, and its political, cultural, economic, and other historical aspects.

In the oral examination, students are examined in four fields (except for the African field), one of which may be an approved field in anthropology, economics, geography, language and literature, philosophy, political science, or other allied subjects. This allied field must be comparable in size and scope to the established fields in history included under Major Fields or Sub-disciplines. Students should select the fields in consultation with their adviser and must receive the department’s approval of all four fields no less than one to two months before the written qualifying examination is taken.

In most fields, the oral examination will be held shortly after the written examination or, at the discretion of the doctoral committee, as late as six months after the written examination. All students must write a dissertation prospectus that must be approved by the doctoral committee chair and given to each member of the doctoral committee prior to the oral qualifying examination. In the European field, students must choose their four fields by the quarter after they have successfully passed the doctoral written qualifying examination (i.e., normally by the seventh quarter of residency). To obtain approval, students must provide the Graduate Affairs Committee with the name of the faculty member who has agreed to serve as the sponsor of the doctoral work and the details of the proposed program.

A full-time graduate student must begin the written qualifying exmainations no later than the end of the ninth quarter of graduate work. The written qualifying examination includes the major field only, except in the Ancient, European, Science and Medieval fields. In African, Ancient, U.S., European, Jewish, Medieval, History of Science, South and Southeast Asia and Middle East history, each field administers a written qualifying examination as outlined below.

Both the written and oral examinations are to be considered by the committee as a whole in arriving at a judgment of the student’s performance, except in the European field. The written qualifying examination is normally prepared and administered by the chair of the committee and read by the entire committee before the oral qualifying examination, except for the U.S. and European fields, for which separate procedures are outlined below. All students in the European field take the doctoral written qualifying examination during spring break between the fifth and sixth quarters in residence.

Ancient Field

Written Qualifying Examination

Students present four fields for preliminary examinations. Three of these must be in History (e.g. Greece, Rome, and Late Antiquity), and the fourth may be another History field from another department (e.g. literal history, Roman law or paleography). The preliminary exam lasts for eight hours, and is usually taken after approximately three years of work in the department.

Oral Qualifying Examination

Upon passing the written qualifying examinations, the student must take the oral qualifying examination. The oral qualifying examination has three basic components: (1) a return to issues raised in the written qualifying examinations; (2) an oral examination by the committee members; and (3) a defense of the written doctoral research prospectus.

African Field

Written Qualifying Examination

Students must produce a substantial research paper based, at least in part, on primary sources prior to taking the Ph.D. qualifying examinations. Students must pass an eight-hour written examination to be taken no later than the end of the ninth quarter of the program.

Oral Qualifying Examination

The oral examination must be completed within a period not exceeding six months from the passing of the written examination. The oral qualifying examination has three basic components: (1) a return to issues raised in the written qualifying examinations; (2) an oral examination by the committee members in the two outside fields; and (3) a defense of the written doctoral research prospectus.

U.S. Field

Written Qualifying Examination

Students must take the written qualifying examination following 12 months in academic residence. The written qualifying examination is administered once a year at the beginning of Fall Quarter. Students who fail the examination may retake it once by petition when it is offered again at the beginning of the next Fall Quarter. Students who fail the examination a second time are not permitted to continue in the program.

The examination committee consists of three faculty members who in the previous year taught History 246A-246B-246C. If any of these faculty members are unavailable, preference is given, in replacing such members, to faculty members who have taught History 246A-246B-246C in recent years. The written examination is intended to test a comprehensive broad understanding of American history both before and after the independence of the U.S. All facets of history (political, social, diplomatic, etc.) are included. Therefore, an ability to synthesize factual information, sometimes across long chronological periods, is essential. Knowledge of the scholarly literature and of the principal historiographical controversies arising out of it is tested along with the student’s interpretive capabilities. Passing of the examination implies that the student is qualified, in the judgment of the U.S. field, to teach courses in U.S. history at the college level. Questions related to the planning of such courses may appear on the examination.

Oral Qualifying Examination

Students must complete all prior degree requirements before taking the University Oral Qualifying Examination. Students who have outstanding incomplete grades are not permitted to take this examination. The examination is normally taken during a student’s third year of study. The examination committee must include four faculty members, including the student’s adviser. Normally, two members come from the U.S. field. One member must come from a field in the department other than the U.S. field, and one must come from another department.

During the examination, students are questioned about their dissertation proposal and, in connection with the proposal and their preparation with the members of the examination committee, they also may be questioned on related fields of study. Students either pass or fail the examination. By majority vote of the committee, students who fail the examination may retake it once. Students whose committees do not agree to a repeat of the examination and students who fail the examination a second time are not permitted to continue in the program.

European Field

Written Qualifying Examination

All students in the European field take the doctoral written qualifying examination, which usually begins during spring break between the fifth and sixth quarters in residence (i.e. in the second year).

Prior to taking the written qualifying examination, a student must have met the following requirements: passed at least one departmental language examination; completed History 204; completed one two-quarter research seminar; started a second two-quarter research seminar; completed the minimum number of other courses required during the first five quarters; and have secured the agreement of a qualified member of the department in the European field to serve as chair of the doctoral committee. Students who fail the examination may petition to retake it in the following Spring Quarter. The examination may be retaken only once. Students who enter with a B.A. degree who fail the doctoral examination will be allowed to complete the M.A. program as outlined in the requirements.

By the end of the Spring Quarter of their first year, students will have selected three fields in which to be examined – one major (the area in which their intended Ph.D. will lie) and two minor. They will also have selected and secured the agreement of three faculty members with whom to prepare those fields. The three faculty members will form the examinations committee for that student. One of the three members will be the student’s adviser, who heads the committee and bears responsibility for the overall coordination of the student’s preparation. Note that the examination committee is not the same as the dissertation committee, which is formally appointed later (before the defense of the dissertation proposal). However, the expectation is that students will choose their examination committee with a firm eye on the task of composing their dissertation committee, and that there will normally be some continuity of personnel between the two.

The student’s choice of fields must be confirmed by the field’s faculty in its yearly evaluation meeting in the Spring Quarter of the student’s first year. In choosing their three fields, students may consult a range of rubrics which the field offers as possible guides to framing their proposals: Europe 1450-1600; Europe 1550-1800; Europe since 1740; European Social and Economic History since 1450; European Intellectual and Cultural History since 1450; Russia since 800; Jewish History; East Central and Southeast Europe since 1450; Germany since 1450; Italy since 1450; Spain and Portugal since 1450; European History of Science since 1450; European Women’s history 1450 to present; Britain since ca. 1450; France since ca 1450; The Low Countries since ca 1450; Colonialism and Imperialism. However, students are asked to tailor these broad frameworks chronologically, conceptually, or thematically, according to their own intellectual and professional needs and interests. Students may also offer completely new fields not currently envisaged – “Environmental History”, for example – and, where appropriate, they may pursue one of their fields outside of the department. Fields can and should be conceptualized within periods of hundreds of years; but they may be limited to periods of less than half a millennium. The major field, however, should contain both an early modern (i.e. pre-c.1750) and modern (i.e. post c.1750) component.

Examinations take the form of three take-home written exams, set by the three relevant faculty members and administered usually over a period of two weeks (i.e. three weekends) beginning in Spring Break. They are intended to test a comprehensive, broad understanding of European history, both of the modern and early modern periods. An ability to synthesize factual information, sometimes across long chronological periods is, consequently, essential. Knowledge of the scholarly literature and of the principal historiographical controversies arising out of it is tested, along with interpretive capabilities. Questions relating to the planning of college-level history courses may appear on the examination.

These written exams will be followed in the subsequent week by an oral examination of approximately one hour conducted by all three faculty members. The committee as a whole will grade the three exams. The purpose of the oral is to allow the committee to ask further questions about the material of their field in order to assure themselves that due competency has been attained. The committee as a whole needs to be unanimous that a candidate has achieved an overall pass by passing each of the fields. The examination process is normally completed by the end of April in the second year.

Oral Qualifying Examination

The Oral Qualifying Examination is usually conducted in the third year of the student’s program. It normally takes place at the end of nine quarters of residence but must be taken by the end of the twelfth quarter. The second language examination must be passed before a student takes the oral examination. Students who fail the oral examination must retake it, at a time set by the committee, within six months. Any variance from time limits must be approved by the European field before going to the Graduate Affairs Committee for final approval.

The Oral Examination is primarily conducted as a discussion of the student’s dissertation prospectus, in the presence of the fourth member of the committee, external to the Department of History, who represents a fourth field and with whom the student has also worked in the preparation of the dissertation prospectus. While the focus of the oral examination is the prospectus itself, students may expect to discuss substantive elements of their four fields as they relate to the proposed research in the prospectus.

Jewish Field

Written Qualifying Examination

Students must take a written qualifying examination by the end of the third year of study. The written qualifying examination consists of two components: (1) a written examination in the major field, and (2) a two-hour oral examination covering all four fields, to be taken within a week of the written examination.

Oral Qualifying Examination

The University Oral Qualifying Examination, which is a defense of the dissertation prospectus, must be taken within six months of passing the written qualifying examination.

Latin American Field

Written Qualifying Examination

The written qualifying examination is administered by the student’s principal adviser, focusing on the subfield (colonial or modern) in which the student is specializing. The examination normally consists of two broad, substantive questions which do not overlap with content covered in the dissertation prospectus. The written examination should be taken at least one week before the oral examination.

Oral Qualifying Examination

The oral qualifying examination focuses on questions and issues related to the dissertation prospectus, which must be distributed to members of the committee at least two weeks before the date of the examination.

Medieval Field

Written Qualifying Examination

The written examination includes questions set by members of the student’s medieval fields. Students are examined in four fields, including two medieval fields, one historical field outside of medieval history, and one field outside of history.

Oral Qualifying Examination

A portion of the oral qualifying examination explores the student’s dissertation prospectus. Committee members may also follow up on the written qualifying examination and pose additional questions to their fields. The oral qualifying examination is usually taken one week following the written qualifying examination. With agreement of their committee, students may take the oral exam up to six months after the written exam, in order to complete additional reading or prepare a dissertation prospectus.

Middle East Field

Written Qualifying Examination

Students are examined in each of two Middle East fields. One of these is the major field, the other field can be outside of the Middle East with the permission of the chair of the dissertation committee. The major field might be Pre-Modern Middle Eastern history, Early Modern Middle Eastern history, Modern Middle Eastern history, or Armenian history.

Oral Qualifying Examination

The oral qualifying examination focuses on questions relating to the dissertation prospectus, which must be distributed to members of the committee at least two weeks before the oral examination.

Science Field

Written Qualifying Examination

Students must take the written qualifying examination in June of the second year of study. Students are examined in three distinct fields: (1) Core field which is a general overview of the history of science, medicine, and technology from the ancients to the present; (2) Specific/major field which is defined by the student in close consultation with relevant faculty members; (3) Field outside the history of science, in an area taught in the other fields of the department. Students should consult with their faculty adviser regarding the outside field.

Oral Qualifying Examination

The oral examination should be taken as soon after the written examination as possible but not later than the end of the third year of graduate study.

South and Southeast Asia Field

Written Qualifying Examination

Students must take a written examination in at least three of their four chosen fields of study, chosen in consultation with the student’s adviser and two additional faculty members, who will administer the examination.

Oral Qualifying Examination

The oral examination is held shortly after the written examination or, at the discretion of the doctoral committee, as late as six months after the written examination.

Advancement to Candidacy

Students are advanced to candidacy and awarded the Candidate in Philosophy (C. Phil.) degree upon successful completion of the written and oral qualifying examinations.

Doctoral Dissertation

Every doctoral degree program requires the completion of an approved dissertation that demonstrates the student’s ability to perform original, independent research and constitutes a distinct contribution to knowledge in the principal field of study.

Final Oral Examination (Defense of Dissertation)

Not required for all students in the program. The decision as to whether a defense is required is made by the doctoral committee.

Time-to-Degree

Students who enter the program with a bachelor’s degree are expected to complete the Ph.D. within 18 to 21 quarters, depending on the requirements of the specific field. Students who enter the program with a master’s degree are expected to complete the degree within 12 to 15 quarters. Further, a doctoral candidate is expected to complete the dissertation no later than 18 quarters from the date of matriculation into the fields of U.S., England or European Colonialism and Imperialism, or within 21 quarters of the date of entry into all other fields. The following is a suggested timeline:

End of three quarters: completion of six to nine courses, one foreign language examination.

End of six quarters: completion of master’s coursework, additional language requirements, master’s written examinations, and submission of research papers.

End of nine to 12 quarters: completion of additional language requirements as specified by the field, completion of the prospectus and oral examinations.

End of 15 quarters: completion of archival research.

End of 18 to 21 quarters: completion of dissertation writing.

This timeline is a suggested model. Students are encouraged to complete the program in an even shorter time than suggested, if possible. The Graduate Affairs Committee reviews student progress on a regular basis and informs students who are failing to make normative time-to-degree progress.

DEGREE NORMATIVE TIME TO ATC (Quarters) NORMATIVE TTD

MAXIMUM TTD

PhD 12 21 27

Termination of Graduate Study and Appeal of Termination

University Policy

A student who fails to meet the above requirements may be recommended for termination of graduate study. A graduate student may be disqualified from continuing in the graduate program for a variety of reasons. The most common is failure to maintain the minimum cumulative grade point average (3.00) required by the Academic Senate to remain in good standing (some programs require a higher grade point average). Other examples include failure of examinations, lack of timely progress toward the degree and poor performance in core courses. Probationary students (those with cumulative grade point averages below 3.00) are subject to immediate dismissal upon the recommendation of their department. University guidelines governing termination of
graduate students, including the appeal procedure, are outlined in Standards and Procedures for Graduate Study at UCLA.

Special Departmental or Program Policy

A student may be recommended for termination at the end of the first year if the Graduate Affairs Committee determines, after consultation with the faculty in the student’s field of study, that the student does not have the academic qualifications for successfully completing a degree. If a student’s grade point average falls below 3.00 due to Incomplete grades that lapse to F, the student is given the opportunity to remove the F grades within one quarter before action is taken regarding a recommendation for termination.

A student, who fails to proceed according to normal progress stipulations, is subject to termination except in cases in which extenuating circumstances prevent the student from meeting specified deadlines. A student may be granted a one year extension of time by petitioning the Graduate Affairs Committee and showing that the dissertation can be completed within one year. Further extensions are considered on an individual basis, taking into consideration the extent and type of research required, availability of source material, and other, sometimes personal, mitigating factors which may cause delays. It is the student’s responsibility to inform both the doctoral chair and the graduate office of progress (or lack thereof) and estimated completion dates. A student may be recommended for termination after 21 quarters if there has been no communication with the department after the oral qualifying examination.